designated

designated

A designated landmark is an officially recognized historic building or structure. For historic landmarks or places in the United States, the terms “designated” and “designation” have official meanings, as determined by U.S. government agencies or a local Landmarks Preservation Commission or similar agency. The procedures for approving a designated landmark involve specific activities in each case. Within the U.S., National Historic Landmarks are officially designated by the Secretary of the Interior after a lengthy nomination and selection process to determine eligibility. The properties are chosen due to their broad historic value from a nationwide perspective across the entire United States.”National Historic Landmarks, Questions & Answers”, U.S. National Park Service, June 2009, webpage: NPS-gov-NHL-QA: the text on that page is public domain to allow verbatim copying (of whole sentences, word for word). “Introduction to Michigan’s National Historic Landmark Program”, Michigan Historical Center, Department of History, Arts and Libraries, October 2002, webpage: Mich-gov-HAL-124. By 1999, almost 2,300 properties had been designated as U.S. National Historic Landmarks. Local properties, with only limited historic impact, can be listed instead on the National Register of Historic Places. Owners of a property can refuse a nomination and prevent that property from being designated. Once designated, a property retains its original ownership, and the owner can make any changes without restriction. However, if a property is heavily modified, to lose its historic value, then the designation can be removed. There are U.S. federal funds available to help maintain designated properties, or help to guide privately funded changes, so as to not ruin the historic value of a designated landmark.

Vocabulary

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